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Revell-Monogram Hot Wheels SnapTite Camaro Concept

April 2008
RELATED TOPICS: MONOGRAM | REVELL | SNAP | STYRENE
Hot Wheels Camaro Concept
Revell-Mongram No. 85-1953
Model Type: Styrene snap kit
Molded Colors: Black, clear, orange
Scale: 1/25
MSRP: $14.55
Pros: "Cool factor" for kids
Cons: Parts-fit issues make for challenging assembly
The much-anticipated Camaro concept car is now available in a snap kit that's cobranded with Hot Wheels for maximum appeal to young modelers.

In an effort to test this idea, I asked our 13-year-old son, Bill, to assemble the kit. He has made a few snap kits, so the process wasn't brand-new to him, but the car had sufficient "cool factor" to try as a father-son project.

I was skeptical about the box-art claim that the model could be built in 20 minutes, and I was correct: Even with me helping in a couple of the rough spots, removing most of the parts from the sprues, and applying the stickers, the model took more than an hour to complete. That's not a big deal in and of itself, but it's certainly not 20 minutes - and when you're dealing with short attention-spans anyway, time is precious.

I'll leave it to hardcore Camaro lovers to discuss and debate the accuracy of the kit; I was focused mainly on the assembly process. The engraving does appear crisp and clean, though there is flash in a couple of places that will require an experienced hand to remove cleanly.

The instructions are clear, and coupled with the low parts count, chances of making a mistake are small. However, in several places, we encountered difficulty getting parts to stay snapped together. I superglued the one-piece glass to the roof, glued the seat halves together, and glued the seats to the interior. Again, not a big deal for an experienced builder, but the sort of thing that could - and did, in Bill's case - frustrate a young
modeler.

The biggest assembly "issue" came in a classic spot: stacking the body, chassis, and interior. The fit is close and tight, and it was not easy to get everything aligned well enough to screw the whole business together.
After several attempts, and a fair amount of pushing and tugging, we were able to get three of the four screws in place. Unfortunately, the chassis warped slightly, binding one axle and making one wheel slightly off-contact.

Stickers are used instead of decals, and they're a bit tricky to get aligned and laid down smoothly. I spent more than the allotted 20-minute build time just getting them photo-worthy.

There's potential in this kit, but as Bill said, "some things were harder than they needed to be." In a future issue, Matthew Usher will take a closer look with an upgraded version.

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