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Tamiya Yamaha YZ250

RELATED TOPICS: TAMIYA | MOTORCYCLE
Yamaha YZ250
Tamiya No. 16036
Model Type: Injection-molded styrene
Molded Colors: Black, white
Scale: 1/6
MSRP: $131.00
Pros: Good change-of-pace build; nice engine; good parts fit
Cons: Toylike plating on wheels; plastic chain unrealistic
The Yamaha YZ 250 is a reissued kit of the race works bike that won the 1973 Motocross Championship.      

Upon opening the box you will find plastic trees molded in black, white, satin and bright chrome. There is also a flexible plastic tree that has handlebar grips, a carburetor bladder, and the seat. The front forks are polished metal, along with a few bolts and nuts to assemble the wheels to the axles.     

Early steps in the instructions require building of the bike frame and swing arm. Like most Tamiya engineering, the fit is flawless. The frame is accurate, and to make it perfect, the seams where the two halves join could be filled.  

The two-stroke 250cc engine is accurately molded and true to the 1:1 counterpart. It fits in the frame and is secured by plastic bolts that slide in tight – you really do not have to glue them.

The ignition coil box is molded in soft, flexible plastic, with the plug boot on the end that fits tight to the spark plug. Tamiya also provides the electrical connections coming off the ignition box in flexible plastic line that disappears into the crankcase cover.

A watertight bladder fits on top of the carburetor, with a locating pin to install the provided vinyl accelerator cable. The YZ250 features a mono shock mounted under the fuel tank, and a provided spring makes it functional.  

The exhaust is assembled in halves with the seams cleverly hidden where the real seams would be on the 1:1 bike. Tamiya also provided the exhaust clamp springs for added realism.

The wheels, tires, and chain are the let down in this kit; a 1/6 scale model should have hand-wound spokes and a real chain. The plating on the wheels is toylike; if I were to redo this build, I would strip the wheels and paint them with Alclad. The rear wheel is fitted to the axle with a brass rod threaded on each end, secured by metal nuts.

The tank is molded in halves, so the seam will need to be eliminated.

The decals provide roundels in red and yellow, and numbers 1-6 as markings. These decals went on with minimal Solvaset. They seemed to be a little bit brittle.

The front fork is a model in itself. Tamiya makes the entire unit functional by dropping springs into each fork lower casing. Tamiya provides rubber tube sleeves that fit onto each down tube.

The handlebars are chrome-plated plastic that look okay, but again would be stripped and repainted in Alclad if I built it again. The handlebar grips are molded in flexible black plastic and look realistic. The front wheel is installed the same way as the rear wheel, with a threaded brass rod and nuts.

Installing the front fork to the front tubes on the frame is a little tricky. You must push the lower station plate down to allow the lower locating pin to slip into the bottom hole on the frame tube. A plastic bolt secures the top.

Final assembly includes securing the front number plate to the fork with a kit supplied rubber band. The tank is secured with a molded tab on bottom front area and a plastic bolt to the rear.

The seat also secures tightly to locating tabs on the rear fender and a tab at the front. Even the side airbox covers snap on, with no glue needed.

This was an enjoyable build that provided a nice change of pace. If you are a big dirt-bike fan, this kit is for you as long as you understand it is a 1970s- era dirt bike. I strongly recommend you give it a shot!

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