SEARCH SCALEAUTOMAG.COM

Enter keywords or a search phrase below:

Paint job bubble-ups

RELATED TOPICS: AMT | REVELL | MONOGRAM | PAINT
Q: Is there a difference between the plastic used in AMT/Ertl and Revell-Monogram models? Almost all of my paint jobs bubble up on AMT (but not R-M) models. I use Testor enamels over Testor spray-can primer, and I treat each model the same - from sanding, prepping, washing, drying, and painting - with no luck.

Also, when I mask a two-tone paint job, the paint sometimes lifts off when I pull off the tape. What am I doing wrong?

- Neil Lambie Jr.
Germany

Ken: Although AMT/Ertl and Revell-Monogram may use different formulas in their styrene production, that shouldn't make a difference in your paint jobs. Unless the styrene and the paint are totally incompatible, you should be able to achieve a decent paint job on any object if the surface is correctly prepared; however, care must be taken between steps to ensure a good finish.

In this case, Neil, let's fall back, regroup, and see if we can identify the problem.

After the finish-sanding is done and the car is ready for paint, wash it thoroughly in mild, warm, soapy water and allow it to air-dry. Choose a good-quality automotive primer such as Plasti-kote. Be sure the car body is roughed-up just a little, so the primer will adhere properly; an ultrasmooth surface looks good, but paint can't stick to it (which might contribute to the paint-lifting problem; more on that in a minute).

Handle the model with care. Grease, dirt, and oil from your hands can act as a barrier between the primer and the color coat. If the coat is handled again, wash it again. Apply the spray-can paint in light, thin coats and allow it to dry completely.

That's basically an overview of the painting process. Providing you're doing all that, and getting the same questionable results, what other problems should you look for?

Drying time between coats: Be sure to follow the manufacturer's recommendations to the letter.

Paint compatibility: Take care in using lacquer/enamel combinations, paint from different sources, etc.

Thickness: Build up the color in thin layers, allowing each layer to set before applying the next. Make notes on the painting procedures you've used, so you can refer to them if and when a problem occurs.

The "pulling paint" problem should now disappear, provided you 1) use low-tack masking tape or plastic automotive tape, and 2) remove the tape by slowing pulling it back on itself at a low angle.

Thanks for the questions, Jack. We hope this offers some insight. One of the main reasons paint jobs don't turn out (for me, anyway) is too much handling between steps. Try to keep that to a minimum.


JOIN THE DISCUSSION

Read and share your comments on this article
COMMENT ON THIS ARTICLE

Want to leave a comment?

Only registered members of ScaleAutoMag.com are allowed to leave comments. Registration is FREE and only takes a couple minutes.

Login or Register now.
0
FREE MONTHLY NEWSLETTER
SUBSCRIBER-ONLY CONTENT

CLAIM YOUR FREE GUIDE

50-plus great reader tips!